How I built a Kubernetes cluster so my coworkers could deploy apps faster

How do you encourage your development team to build more projects without being bogged down with deployment? As a company that builds mobile and web products, it’s a priority that we create an environment where our team members focus on building rather than deploying.

But even if we have a deployment platform, we’ll still need someone to manage the administration. As engineers, anything we have to repeat, we want to automate.

What would be a secure way to give our developers access to our deployment platform?

  1. We want to allow our developers to build their own projects (perhaps personal) without needing to ask an administrator for permission or resources to deploy a new application for testing or experimenting
  2. Our developers can deploy their own application, update it, or remove it
  3. Lower barriers for trying out new things (so to speak)
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How to manage your static websites with AWS S3, CloudFront, and a command line

Here’s a short list of things you shouldn’t need to worry about when setting up a static website:

  • scaling up your servers for surges in traffic
  • logging into the AWS Management Console just to upload a new index.html file
  • spending US$5 to host a single static website

I myself was sick of worrying about these things. So I learned some Go, developed a small command line tool over the weekend, and open-sourced it.

AWS S3 is an affordable option for for hosting (and free for first time users), and AWS CloudFront is good for CDN. But setting up the two is a pain.
Continue reading “How to manage your static websites with AWS S3, CloudFront, and a command line”